Inside the script:

All Debts Paid

See what the crew says about your favorite scenes.

EPISODE 303
All Debts Paid

WRITTEN BY

Matthew B. Roberts

BASED ON THE NOVEL BY
DIANA GABALDON

FINAL PRODUCTION DRAFT
2nd March 2017

OUTLANDER
EPISODE 303 "All Debts Paid"

PREVIOUS REVISIONS

Production Draft – 8th July 2016
Full Blue Draft – 27th July 2016
Full Pink Draft – 22nd August 2016
Full Yellow Draft – 30th August 2016


EPISODE 303 "All Debts Paid"

CAST LIST — FINAL PRODUCTION DRAFT — 2nd March 2017

CLAIRE BEAUCHAMP RANDALL
JAMIE MACKENZIE FRASER
FRANK RANDALL
MURTAGH FITZGIBBONS FRASER

BRIANNA RANDALL (8, 10)
BRIANNA RANDALL (16, 18)
COLONEL HARRY QUARRY
CORPORAL BRAME
JOE ABERNATHY
MAJOR JOHN WILLIAM GREY

DUNCAN KERR
HAYES
LESLEY
MACKAY
SANDY TRAVERS

CONCERNED HUSBAND
FOOTMAN
PHYSICIAN
PRIEST


EPISODE 303 "All Debts Paid"

SET LIST — FINAL PRODUCTION DRAFT — 2nd March 2017

INTERIORS

  • Ardsmuir Prison (1755)
    • Governor’s Quarters (1755,
    • 1756)
    • Guards’ Room
    • Large Cell
  • Boston Hospital (1966)
    • Hallway
    • Room
  • High School (1966)
    • Auditorium
  • Claire & Frank’s Home
    • Dining Room (1964)
    • Front Door Step (1958)
    • Kitchen (1956)
    • Living Room (1958, 1966)

EXTERIORS

  • Ardsmuir Prison (1755)
    • Establishing (1755, 1756)
    • Near the Wall
    • Nearby Moor
    • The Yard (1755, 1756)
  • Claire & Frank’s Home (1958)
    • Front Door Step
  • Helwater (1756)
    • Stables
  • Lake District of England (1756)
    • Road
  • Road Near Ardsmuir (1755)
  • Scottish Moor (1755)
  • Shoreline (1755)
  • Western Scotland (1755)

OUTLANDER

“All Debts Paid”

FADE IN:

1EXT. WESTERN SCOTLAND - DAY (D) (755)1

Establishing. If Scotland had a Siberia this would be it.
FIND THE WALLED FORTRESS -- ARDSMUIR PRISON. And even though
it’s not on an island it might as well be, surrounded by
moors on three sides and backed by the North Atlantic.

2EXT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - THE YARD - DAY (D1) (1755) 2

FIND the governor of the prison, COLONEL HARRY QUARRY, and
MAJOR JOHN WILLIAM GREY, his successor. Quarry is in the
middle of giving Grey the two cent tour. This is Quarry’s
last day as governor. He’s overjoyed to be leaving
perdition. [Note: The role of JOHN WILLIAM GREY who appeared
in episode 209 will be recast, therefore neither the audience
nor Jamie is meant to recognize him at first.]

Matthew B. Roberts

This scene is crucial as it’s the first time the audience is introduced to Lord John Grey in adult form. We wanted to ensure that he was given a proper introduction–especially since it’s unusual for us, as a show, to open on two characters who are neither Claire nor Jamie. We chose to shift the focus here precisely because of how important a character Lord John becomes going forward.

JOHN GREY
Does it rain all the time?

COLONEL QUARRY
Chin up, My Lord. The drink here
is fine compensation. I’ve left
you a list of booze-merchants...

(winks, then)
Paperwork’s the worst of the duty.
After that there’s not a great deal
to do, really, save to hunt for
grouse and... Frenchman’s Gold.

JOHN GREY
The fortune in bullion that Louis
of France sent to Charles Stuart?

COLONEL QUARRY
They say the Highland army hid it
somewhere on this moor. I was
captivated by it my first year,
determined to find it. But after a
few years I finally yielded to my
better senses. However, whoever
does deliver a treasure such as
that to London would certainly have
the attention of the Crown.

Grey surveys the PRISONERS in the yard, most of them
malnourished and ragged as scarecrows.

JOHN GREY
I understand the prisoners to be
mostly Jacobite Highlanders.

COLONEL QUARRY
Yes. And docile as sheep. No
heart in them after Culloden.

(then)
God, I’ll be glad to get back to
civilization.

JOHN GREY
Not much in the way of local
society, I gather?

COLONEL QUARRY
My dear fellow! “Society” will
consist solely of conversation with
your officers -- and one prisoner.

JOHN GREY
A prisoner?

COLONEL QUARRY
You’ve heard of Red Jamie Fraser?

Grey stiffens slightly, but keeps his face immovable.

JOHN GREY
Of course. The man was notorious
during the Rising.

COLONEL QUARRY
Well, we have him. He’s the only
Jacobite officer here and the only
one we keep chained. Convicted
traitor to the Crown, lasted six
years as a fugitive after Culloden.
That’s him over there...

Grey sees -- JAMIE FRASER on the other side of the prison
yard, wearing SHACKLES and surrounded by a group of SCOTS.

COLONEL QUARRY (cont’d)
The prisoners treat him as their
chief. They call him Mac Dubh. I
don’t know what it means -- a sign
of respect of some sort. If matters
arise, he acts as their spokesman.

The guards are afraid of him --
those who fought at Prestonpans say
he’s the Devil.

JOHN GREY
Poor Devil now.

Grey stares at Jamie, emotion rising to the surface. But
why? Rage and humiliation play on his face, as he fights to
mask it. He CLEARS his throat.

Jamie looks up, stares back at Grey, studying the man’s face,
feeling a sense of familiarity, but not able to place him.
The prisoners lower their eyes out of respect to the new
governor. But Jamie seems neither afraid nor intimidated.

COLONEL QUARRY
You’ll need Fraser’s good will and
cooperation. I had him take supper
with me once a week. You might try
the same arrangement.

JOHN GREY
I will not dine with that... a
prisoner.

Grey’s hands are clenched at his sides as he imagines that
icicles will grow in hell before he dines with Red Jamie.

COLONEL QUARRY
(pitying)
Do as you wish. I’ll leave you to
it then. Good luck, Major.

OFF GREY, glancing back at Jamie, as we wonder what his
interest is in the tall Scot --

3INT. CLAIRE & FRANK’S HOME - KITCHEN - DAY (D1) (1956)3

CLAIRE, in her second year of medical school, is at the
table, pouring over her medical BOOKS while FRANK makes
breakfast. She peeks up, having caught a whiff of something
delectable.

CLAIRE
Is that what I think it is?

FRANK
It is. A full English breakfast.

CLAIRE
Black pudding and bread fried in
the bacon fat?

FRANK
Of course.

CLAIRE
What’s the occasion?

FRANK
Bree came home from school the
other day and asked for...

(horrified)
“Eggo” toaster waffles. In that
moment, I determined she needed
more Englishness in her life.

He brings over a plate and sets it down on the table.

CLAIRE
So your plan now is to feed the
American out of her?

FRANK
Well... It’s either that or
replacing her Dr. Seuss with
Dickens.

They both start LAUGHING. She samples the pudding. It’s
delicious and takes her to a place she hasn’t been in
forever.

CLAIRE
Oh that’s delicious, I’ve missed
that.

FRANK
Perhaps I’m onto something.

It’s like old times.

CLAIRE
You know, I don’t have class
tonight and I’ve read as much as I
care to about gallbladders. Maybe
we could go see a film later. Joe
said The Searchers was fantastic.
But if you’re not in the mood for a
western, Carousel might be fun...

FRANK
Sounds lovely.

She brightens.

FRANK (cont’d)
But actually... I’ve already seen
both of them.

CLAIRE
Both, really?

Then Claire realizes he means... with a date. She feels
foolish. Wounded even.

CLAIRE (cont’d)
Oh. Sorry.

FRANK
That was what we agreed upon? You
have your social life, I have mine.
We’re free to make plans with
whomever we’d like...

CLAIRE
Of course. You’re right.

Claire recalls their agreement. But it’s one thing in
theory, another to be confronted with the reality.

FRANK
I’m being discreet, just as you
asked.

CLAIRE
Yes, you have been. Thank you.

The moment is gone now, as quickly as it came. And having
nothing more to say, Frank goes back to his cooking as
BRIANNA, 8, enters and skips over to Claire.

Matthew B. Roberts

This particular scene is not taken from the bookit’s an original scene. We wanted to portray the idea that Claire and Frank have come to what is essentially a tacit agreement to live their lives happily and harmoniously in front of Briannaputting on a performance for her. Notable here is the fact that the scene begins in a good place–a neutral placeas the couple discuss breakfast, but the ‘turn’ in the scene comes when Claire discovers that she has been so focused on medical school that, in a way, she has failed to realize that Frank has moved on. When Brianna enters, however, both Claire and Frank resume their respective performances as happily married, dutiful husband and wife for the sake of the child. It could be said that the Claire and Frank storyline in this episode was envisioned as a kind of two-person, three-act playa play focussed upon the disintegration of a marriage. This is how I imagined it during the writing process. We witness the slow erosion of their relationship rather than one large explosion that brings it to a complete end, something that amounts to a few small beats in each scene. It is as though there are subtle chinks in their armour, an amour which they must eventually remove before blood is shed so to speak, as we will see much later.

4INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - LARGE CELL - NIGHT (N1) (1755)4

Jamie’s now back in a large cell area with a group of
prisoners, including HAYES and LESLEY, who grill him about
the new governor.

HAYES
Have ye seen the new governor yet?

JAMIE
I had a look at him in the yard.
But we havena spoken.

HAYES
Well, better the Devil ye ken, than
the Devil ye don’t. Handsome Harry
was no’ sae bad.

LESLEY
No, he wasna. But he was better
than that shite-face Bogle, aye?

HAYES
What’s your meaning, man?

LESLEY
If Handsome was better than Bogle,
and Handsome was the Devil we didna
ken, and Bogle the one that we did --
you’re wrong, man.

HAYES
No, I’m not!

LESLEY
Ye’re always wrong! Why d’ye
argue, when ye’re never in the
right?

They turn to Jamie, their leader.

HAYES
Mac Dubh, was I wrong?

JAMIE
No, Hayes, ye’re no’ wrong. But we
canna say if ye’re right yet.

Knowing that Hayes and Lesley can go on for hours, Jamie
moves toward a different part of the cell. A dark corner
where a DEEP MALE VOICE comes from the shadows.

MALE VOICE (O.C.)
So ye’ve seen the new governor,
then? Is it what the neep-heids
are blathering about, is he the
Devil ye know?

JAMIE
Dinna ken what sort of man he is
yet. Seems familiar. Though I
canna place him. Name is Grey...

MALE VOICE (O.C.)
No matter...

Only now does the prisoner step out of the shadows and REVEAL
his face -- and it’s definitely familiar. MURTAGH
FITZGIBBONS FRASER. Good news -- he did not die at Culloden
[Episode 301]. He was imprisoned in Ardsmuir for the entire
time Jamie hid in the cave near Lallybroch.

Captivity and time have taken a toll. Murtagh’s gaunt face
and raspy COUGH tells us he’s suffering from the grippe, a
form of influenza.

Matthew B. Roberts

This scene represents what is a major departure from the book because it’s here we reveal that Murtagh is still alive: not necessarily alive and well, but he is indeed alive, having survived Culloden and having been brought to Ardsmuir Prison. In terms of the overarching development of the story, we knew we wanted to keep Murtagh alive ever since the middle of the second season, but it was essential for us to find the right time and place to reveal this to the audience. Ultimately, this seemed to be the most appropriate time, coinciding very organically with the natural progression of the story.

We love Duncan Lacroix as an actor (and as a person too!) and wanted to ensure that Murtagh wasn’t simply an ‘accessory’ to the scene here, but an integral part of the storytelling process. This was the perfect place for him to reappear and for us to see Jamie taking care of his Godfather. We tried to carefully balance Murtagh’s time on screen with that of some of the other characters such as Lord John Grey.

MURTAGH
All the mollies look alike. Take
God’s own eye to tell one from
another.

JAMIE
They say the same about us.

Jamie’s noticed that Murtagh’s holding a small SCRAP of
fabric, the FRASER TARTAN.

MURTAGH
They could tell well enough if they
allowed us to wear our tartans.

JAMIE
Ye’d best tuck that away. Ye ken
the punishment for having that.

Murtagh does know. But for him, it’s a talisman, something
that reminds him of a home and a time long past. After a
beat, he reluctantly hides it away into a crevice in the
stone.

MURTAGH
So ye took no measure of the man?

JAMIE
He’s gey young. Looks scarce more
than a bairn, though I reckon he’s
older than he looks. But he
carries himself well. Shoulders
square and a ramrod up his arse.

MURTAGH
Aye. The ramrod is standard issue
in the British Army.

Jamie notices Murtagh scratching at a wound.

JAMIE
Ye’ve been bitten again.

MURTAGH
The rats are growin’ uncommon bold.

Jamie gropes into a BAG and comes up with some WILTED STALKS.

JAMIE
This’ll help with any festering.
And with la grippe as well.

MURTAGH
Och, not more of the damn thistles.
Do ye think me a pig?

JAMIE
Ye’re as stubborn as one. It’s
only milk thistle. Take the heads
off, and mash the leaves and stems.
I learnt the trick from... a lass
who knew a fair amount about
healing.

Murtagh reacts, he knows Jamie’s speaking about Claire,
although he doesn’t use her name, and hasn’t in years.

JAMIE (cont’d)
If they’re too prickly to eat
spread on a bannock, I’ll make ye a
tea and have ye drink it. I’ve yet
to see pigs drink tea.

MURTAGH
All right. I’ll try yer brew. But
I’m no’ mashing any damned
thistles.

Their roles are now reversed as Jamie looks out for his
Godfather, something Murtagh gruffly tolerates. But as Jamie
makes the tea, Murtagh studies him, worried for the pain he
knows still haunts Jamie’s heart.

4INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - GOVERNOR’S QUARTERS - DAY (D2) (1755)5

The Governor’s quarters is a combination office/living area.
On one side of the room there is a LARGE DESK and
BOOKSHELVES, on the other side, a DINING TABLE and SMALL BED.

Grey is absorbed in PAPERWORK when CORPORAL BRAME enters.

CORPORAL BRAME
The prisoner, sir, as commanded.

Grey gestures with his hand without looking up, and Brame
signals the GUARDS waiting just outside the door to enter.
They do, pulling the CHAINS attached to the tall redheaded
prisoner behind him, like an animal on a leash.

Jamie stands in front of Grey, somewhere between at attention
and at ease. Grey is formal with him.

JOHN GREY
James Fraser?

JAMIE
Aye.

JOHN GREY
I am Major John William Grey, the
new governor of this prison.

Grey pauses, waiting for Jamie to recognize his name, to
remember the meaningful event they shared at Corrieyairack
before Prestonpans almost a decade ago. But Jamie doesn’t
remember -- or at least he doesn’t let on at all. Grey moves
on, covering his nervousness.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
I believe you and Colonel Quarry
had an understanding?

JAMIE
We did.

JOHN GREY
I would like to continue that. You
acting as spokesman for the
prisoners.

JAMIE
Fine.

JOHN GREY
Very well then.

MACKAY, the Scottish prisoner assigned to be Grey’s servant,
enters with a tray of food.

MACKAY
Will you have your supper served in
the sitting room, sir, or in here?

JOHN GREY
In here, prisoner, if you please.

Just as MacKay sets the tray down, there is a SCURRYING SOUND
heard in the corner of the room. Grey looks over and spots a
large RAT.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
God damn my eyes! It’s after my
supper! Has the prison got a cat?

MacKay glances to Jamie for permission to answer... it’s
given with a slight nod.

MACKAY
Aye, sir, there’re cats in the
storerooms.

JOHN GREY
Well, fetch one up here. At once.
Are there many rats in the cells?

Jamie answers this time.

JAMIE
A great many.

MacKay backs up Jamie’s claim.

MACKAY
They sometimes scurry across my
chest whilst I’m sleeping, sir.

JOHN GREY
If you will, Mr. MacKay, please see
that each cell is provided with its
own cat.

(re: look on MacKay’s
face)

Something the matter, MacKay?

Again, it’s Jamie who answers.

JAMIE
With respect, sir, I dinna think
the men would care to have a cat
takin’ all their rats.

JOHN GREY
Surely, the prisoners don’t... eat
them?

JAMIE
Only when they’re lucky enough to
catch one.

Grey takes that in, uneasy, and Jamie reads it on his face.
After a beat, Jamie lets Grey know he’s just as much a
prisoner as everyone else here at Ardsmuir.

JAMIE (cont’d)
God knows what you did to be sent
here. But for your own sake, I
hope you deserved it. Will that be
all then, sir?

Grey bristles, shocked by Jamie’s bold statement, but
unwilling to engage the prisoner at this moment. He opts
instead for a cold dismissal.

JOHN GREY
Yes. For now.

As Jamie exits, HOLD ON Grey, feeling like a cell door is
being slammed on his life.

Matthew B. Roberts

Its here that Jamie re-encounters Lord John Grey–their first meeting in both the episode and in this season. In writing this I had always imagined that it would not have taken Jamie very long to realize that this person, now a grown man, was in fact the young boy he met before the battle of Prestonpans, in Episode 209. The line “God knows what you did to be sent here” is particularly meaningful. It was originally in the mouth of another character but I chose to have Jamie speak it here because, although many years have gone by since their last encounter, it emphasizes the fact that Jamie has indeed recognized Lord John–and is therefore imbued with additional significance.

6INT. CLAIRE & FRANK’S HOME - LIVING ROOM - DAY (D2) (1958)6

A party in progress. Claire has just graduated medical
school and several of her colleagues from Harvard are there
for a casual celebration, including JOE ABERNATHY, whom she
met her first day in the anatomy lab [Episode 302]. The
GRADUATES wear CAPS and GOWNS, and open CHAMPAGNE.

Frank is there too, along with Brianna, now 10, who’s taking
photos.

BRIANNA
Mama! Hold up your diploma!

FLASH! FLASH! FLASH! A succession of snap shots capture
Claire and Joe, proudly holding up their DIPLOMAS. Then Joe
grabs the CAMERA and takes some of Brianna and Claire, then
more of Brianna sandwiched in between Claire and Frank.
Brianna grabs the camera back from Joe.

BRIANNA (cont’d)
(to Claire)

Just you and Daddy, now.

For their child’s sake, Claire and Frank pose awkwardly with
their arms around each other, their strained smiles only
slightly belying how uncomfortable they are in the moment.

The shutter has hardly SNAPPED before Frank breaks away. He
glances at his watch. Then to Claire --

FRANK
Shouldn’t you all be leaving for
Fontaine’s? You wouldn’t want to
miss your reservation.

CLAIRE
We have plenty of time. It’s not
until seven.

BRIANNA
You’re coming with us, aren’t you,
Daddy?

FRANK
I wish I could, my angel. But I’ve
got... some work to finish up.

BRIANNA
(whining, disappointed)

No... if you’re not going, I’m not
going.

She’s Daddy’s girl all right.

FRANK
I’m sure you’ll have a grand time.

(lower, to Claire)
I thought the reservation was at
six.

CLAIRE
I’m sorry, it’s seven.

(jokey)
We’ll be out of your hair soon
enough.

Frank goes to the phone to make a call. Joe, who has taken
the liberty of mixing TWO MARTINIS, notices the tension and
distracts Claire.

JOE
Calling Doctor Randall.

(handing her a drink)
Dr. Joe’s salvation elixir.

Claire, grateful for his intervention, lets it all wash off
her as she takes the cold glass.

CLAIRE
Is this your prescription for
everything?

JOE
Nothing a cold martini won’t cure.

CLAIRE
You’re going to be a horrible
doctor.

They smile. Claire sips her drink. Nothing can ruin this
day. Meanwhile, Frank glances nervously at his watch when
suddenly the DOORBELL RINGS. He’s on the other side of the
room, so it’s Claire, nearest to the door, who answers it.

6INT./EXT. CLAIRE & FRANK’S HOME - FRONT DOOR STEP - CONTINUOUS7

A pretty young blonde, SANDY TRAVERS, stands on the porch,
anticipating her date, Frank, will answer the door. But when
it’s NOT him, Sandy is caught completely off-guard and
struggles to cover.

CLAIRE
May I help you?

SANDY
Oh... um, I’m sorry... I think I
might have the wrong house.

Claire catches Sandy’s eyes looking over her shoulder into
the foyer; straight at Frank, who has just come up behind
her. There’s recognition. Sandy and Frank obviously know
one another. Claire steps aside to let Frank receive his
“guest.”

Matthew B. Roberts

This may perhaps be controversial or then again, it may not–there are those who read the books and believe wholeheartedly that Frank commits adultery and there are those who state that there is no concrete evidence for this claim. In the Writers’ Room, we thought that there was reason to suggest that Frank did in fact cheat on Claire. We therefore chose to include Sandy Travers in this episode, the graduate student whom Frank has been seeing. Depicting this visually was important for us: to really be able to see Claire’s response to the woman standing before her on her own doorstep, and so an original scene was created to show this.

CLAIRE
(curtly)
Your work, I presume?

Then Claire moves back inside to address her guests brightly.

CLAIRE (cont’d)
Everyone... I’ve an idea. Why
don’t we head over to the
restaurant now? If they can’t seat
us early we can entertain ourselves
at the bar.

The guests aren’t sure what’s going on, but they’re happy to
continue the party elsewhere. Everyone grabs their jackets,
including Claire, who ushers Brianna along with all the
guests toward the door. The whole gang files out past a
guilty-looking Frank and shame-faced Sandy still hovering in
the foyer. Awkward doesn’t begin to describe it.

8EXT. ROAD NEAR ARDSMUIR - DAY (D3) (1755) 8

On a quiet road somewhere out on the moorland between the
prison and the village, Corporal Brame and MacKay ride on a
SUPPLY WAGON, flanked by TWO REDCOAT GUARDS. They stop
suddenly when they spot -- a MAN wandering aimlessly on the
moor
a short distance away.

CORPORAL BRAME
Halt! What in the Devil...?
Bring me that man.

The mounted Guards ride toward the man. One of them
dismounts and drags him over to where the wagon has stopped.
Brame goes to the man as MacKay watches from atop the wagon.
He is dripping wet and MUMBLING DELIRIOUSLY. (We will come
to learn later that he is DUNCAN KERR.)

DUNCAN
(Gaelic)

White witch.
(English)

The gold is cursed.
(French)

The King's son fled.

DUNCAN G
(Gaelic)

Bana-bhuidseach gheal.
(English)

The gold is cursed.
(French)

Fils du roi s’enfuit.

CORPORAL BRAME
(to the man)
Who are you, sir? Speak plainly!

Kerr is Scottish, but rattling off in a mixture of FRENCH and
GAELIC, with a word or two of English here and there.

CORPORAL BRAME (cont’d)
How do you come by this place?

But the man’s eyes roll back and he shakes with fever. He’s
clearly very ill and out of his mind. His words make no
sense. Brame throws a look back to MacKay.

CORPORAL BRAME (cont’d)
(to MacKay)

Can you decipher what he’s
prattling on about?

MacKay shakes his head, terrified of getting involved. Kerr
keeps rambling. But one word stands out from his nonsense.
The word “gold.” Brame turns to the Guards.

CORPORAL BRAME (cont’d)
Take him with us.

As Kerr is dragged toward the wagon...

9OMITTED 9

10EXT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - THE YARD - DAY (D3) (1755)10

Grey meets with Jamie, still shackled.

JOHN GREY
Mr. Fraser. I thank you for
coming.

JAMIE
You dinna need to thank me when I
hadna choice in the matter.

JOHN GREY
Nevertheless. I summoned you
because a situation has arisen in
which I require your assistance.

JAMIE
And what is that, sir?

JOHN GREY
A man named Duncan Kerr has been
found wandering the moor near the
coast. He appears to be gravely
ill, near death even, and his
speech is deranged. However,
certain matters to which he refers
appear to be of... substantial
interest to the Crown.
Unfortunately, the man in question
has been heard to babble in a
mixture of Gaelic and French, with
no more than a word or two of
English.

JAMIE
And you would like my assistance to
interpret for ye what this man
might have to say?

JOHN GREY
I’m told you speak both Gaelic and
French. We haven’t much time.

Jamie speaks respectfully, but with a glint in his eye which
is anything but.

JAMIE
I fear I must decline, sir.

JOHN GREY
Might I inquire why, Mr. Fraser?

JAMIE
(politely)
I am a prisoner. Not an
interpreter.

Grey’s tone hardens.

JOHN GREY
Your assistance would be --
appreciated. Conversely, a failure
to render legitimate assistance --

Jamie’s tone even harder.

JAMIE
What is not legitimate, is to
extort my services or to threaten
me.

JOHN GREY
I did not threaten you!

JAMIE
Did ye no’? Well I’m pleased to
hear it. In that case, sir, I
shall bid ye good night.

Jamie turns and walks to the door.

JOHN GREY
Mr. Fraser! If you do what I
ask... I will have your irons
struck off.

Jamie hesitates.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
I understand you’ve been wearing
them for three years. I can’t
imagine how heavy they must feel.

ON JAMIE’S SHACKLES --

As they fall from his ankles. From the expression on his
face, we see just how heavy they must have felt, all these
years.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
I have, however, two conditions.
You give a full and true account of
whatever the fellow says. And you
will relay to no one save me any
information you glean.

Very slowly, Jamie turns around.

JAMIE
I have but one condition. That you
provide blankets and medicine for
all the men who are ill.

JOHN GREY
A most ambitious request. We are
in short supply of both and I can’t
possibly bring that about.

JAMIE
Then our conversation is over, sir.
Return the irons, if ye must.

JOHN GREY
Mr. Fraser, believe me when I say
that I would honor your request if
I were able.

JAMIE
I would settle for one man, then.
My kinsman, Murtagh Fitzgibbons.
Been struggling to survive here at
Ardsmuir ever since Culloden.

Grey considers, then --

JOHN GREY
I will inquire as to what we have
in stores.

JAMIE
You have a bargain, sir.

6INT. CLAIRE & FRANK’S HOME - LIVING ROOM - NIGHT (N2) (1958)11

CLOSE ON A DOORKNOB turning, and the door opening very
quietly. Frank enters, trying not to disturb anyone.

CLAIRE (O.C.)
You invited her here? Where our
daughter lives.

Claire’s VOICE startles him as he turns to FIND her sitting
in a chair, smoking a cigarette, prepared to do battle.

FRANK
You took the car, so... she was
picking me up. I thought you’d be
gone already.

CLAIRE
Do you really hate me that much?
It was my graduation, for God’s
sake. You humiliated me in front
of my new colleagues.

Frank is already hammered. He answers coldly.

FRANK
Welcome to the party then.

CLAIRE
What the hell does that mean?

FRANK
Keep your voice down, for God’s
sake, you’ll wake Brianna.

CLAIRE
(rising)
What does that mean?

FRANK
It means you’re not as good an
actress as you think you are,
Claire.

This conversation has been simmering for years, and finally
explodes out in the open.

FRANK (cont’d)
Do you honestly believe anyone at
Harvard thinks we’re a happily
married couple? You’ve convinced
no one with your indifferent
performances. And let’s not
forget, it was your idea for us to
lead separate lives.

Frank POURS himself a SHOT OF WHISKY from the small bar. If
he must have this conversation, he might as well get even
drunker. The gloves come off --

CLAIRE
But you agreed to be discreet.
Having your blonde harlot show up
on our doorstep is quite the
opposite of that.

FRANK
She’s no harlot. In fact, she has
a Ph.D. fellowship in historical
linguistics.

CLAIRE
I’m sure you two’ll have plenty to
discuss then.

FRANK
Jealous now, are we? Green is not
your color.

CLAIRE
You knew how important this day
was. You did this deliberately.
You wanted to hurt me.

FRANK
Perhaps I wanted you to have a
taste of your own medicine, Doctor
Randall.

CLAIRE
Did you fuck her in our bedroom?

FRANK
Our bedroom is far too crowded
already, wouldn’t you agree?

A dig toward the ghost who’s been between them since she
returned from Scotland. A different kind of cheating.
Claire knows she can’t argue, but it infuriates her all the
same. She lashes out at him.

CLAIRE
Then let’s stop all this pretending
then. File for divorce.

FRANK
Divorce?

He can’t believe she’s thrown the word out. He’s deeply
offended.

CLAIRE
Why not? You’d have your freedom.

FRANK
When Millie and Jerry divorced a
year ago, he gained his freedom but
lost his children for it.
Remember, the court ruled they
needed a mother more than a father.
Now he rarely sees them. That will
not happen to me and Brianna
.

CLAIRE
I would never keep Bree from you.
We’d work out a compromise.

FRANK
You’ll forgive me, dear, if I’m not
willing to risk everything on your
goodwill. Or your promises.
You’ve never been very good at
keeping them. And let’s not forget
who pays the bills.

CLAIRE
I don’t need your money. I am
capable of supporting myself now.

FRANK
(sarcastically altruistic)
Really? How successful a medical
career do you think you’ll have,
Claire? It’s difficult enough
being a woman in a man’s profession
without tacking “divorcee” onto
your MD.

Claire takes a beat. He’s right, in 1958 divorce is still
very much a stigma.

FRANK (cont’d)
Is there anything else you’d care
to discuss?

Claire shakes her head, retreats to the chair. He follows
her over, kisses her forehead --

FRANK (cont’d)
There’s a reason we are so terribly
bad at charades, my darling.

Matthew B. Roberts

In the Writers’ Room, we spent a great deal of time in discussions, talking about why Claire, now a doctor, wouldn’t simply end her relationship with Frank and file for divorce. In the period, however, it was still relatively uncommon and very much looked down upon. We wanted to emphasize Claire’s strength and confidence by having her bring up the idea of divorce. Additionally, we wanted to show that, in many ways, Claire and Frank’s situation is very modern and quite unconventional for the time – with Frank being the one spending lots of time with Brianna and afraid to lose custody of her at a time when fathers were not given very much consideration in this regard. Also, here the dialogue touches upon the notion of Claire and Frank giving a performance once again, particular examples being Frank’s line “[…] you’re not as good an actress as you think you are, Claire”, when he later says “you’ve convinced no one with your indifferent performances” and, finally, when the scene ends with Frank stating, “there’s a reason we are so terribly bad at charades, my darling”. This final, rather cutting, line comes from me imagining the couple attending the kinds of dinner parties popular at the time and being utterly terrible at common party-games like charades. Many of us have been with or spent time with someone who’s simply not on the same wavelength, and here we can see that Claire and Frank no longer understand one another, they simply cannot connect with one another.

-- then slides away.

OFF CLAIRE, feeling trapped in a prison of her own --

12INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - GUARDS’ ROOM - DAY (D3) (1755) 12

Jamie’s with Duncan Kerr who’s being kept inside one of the
spare rooms in the guards’ quarters. The furnishings are
sparse, just a SMALL BED and TABLE. Jamie kneels on one side
of Kerr who lies in the bed, moaning and very sick.

Grey watches from the door, listening to WHISPERS of Gaelic
and French, Kerr jumbling his words, struggling to
communicate. Jamie comforts Kerr, holding his hand, and
wiping his fevered brow.

ON GREY -- oddly touched by Jamie’s gentleness with the sick
man as he lies dying. From Grey’s POV we just get a snippet
of the conversation.

JAMIE
(to Kerr, Gaelic)

Be still, a charaid, bi samhach.
Mo charaid.

(Gaelic)
What do you know of the Frenchman’s
gold?

Duncan answers with a mix of French, English, and Gaelic.
(SEE APPENDIX.)

DUNCAN
The gold is cursed. Do ye be
warned, lad. It was given by the
ban-druidh, the white witch.

Jamie’s heart leaps. A white witch?

JAMIE
Who is she? The white witch?

Jamie looks over his shoulder, conscious of Grey watching
him. He says loudly, for Grey’s benefit --

JAMIE (cont’d)
The gold, man. Where is the gold?

He squeezes Duncan’s hand, and Kerr rolls his head side to
side, muttering crazily. Grey comes over --

JOHN GREY
What did he say? What?

JAMIE
(to Kerr)

Speak to me, man, tell me again!

JOHN GREY
Wake up! Speak to us!

Grey shakes Kerr’s shoulders, but Duncan’s eyes roll back in
his head as he gives one last raspy whisper --

DUNCAN
She will come for you.

He closes his eyes, squeezes Jamie’s hand one last time.
Then goes quiet. His hand slips out of Jamie’s. Jamie makes
the sign of the cross. Kerr is dead.

Grey casts a glance toward Kerr’s body as a guard wraps him
in sheets. Grey is eager for information.

JOHN GREY
Well, Mr. Fraser. What did he say?

JAMIE
Mostly gibberish, I’m afraid.
Talking of white witches and
selchs.

JOHN GREY
White witch? Selchs? That’s all
you remember?

Grey is deeply disappointed.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
(suspicious)

You’re holding back.

JAMIE
It’s the truth, I tell you.

JOHN GREY
You are quite positive?

JAMIE
I keep my bargains, sir.

JOHN GREY
Do you, Mr. Fraser? I suspect
there is more to this story.

(impatient, threatening)
I can force you to talk.

Jamie gives a wry smirk.

JAMIE
There’s nothing you can do to me
that hasn’t been done before. So,
try if ye must.

JOHN GREY
We will speak again, Mr. Fraser.

OFF Grey’s frustration and disappointment, and Jamie
wondering what punishment awaits.

13INT. CLAIRE & FRANK’S HOME - DINING ROOM - DAY (D3) (1964)13

There’s a CAKE on the table. The old-fashioned Betty Crocker
kind. SIXTEEN candles. Brianna prepares to make a wish as
the BIRTHDAY SONG is sung. Claire smiles and shakes her
head.

BRIANNA
I know what I’m wishing for.

CLAIRE
Don’t waste it on a car. Because
you’re not getting one.

FRANK
Wish away, you never know.

Frank winks. Bree smiles. Claire gives Frank a displeased
glance. But they’re caught up in the celebration --

Matthew B. Roberts

We discussed the possibility of using what we call ‘chyrons’ here [graphics used to indicate the passage of time], but I wanted to achieve this effect in a way that was more inherent to the telling of the story itself, that is, marking time at various interstitial points without relying on chyrons. I chose to use significant life events such as Claire’s graduation from medical school, as well as Brianna’s sixteenth birthday party and subsequent graduation, each being special occasions which mark the passing of time very specifically, since this episode had to span a number of years.

14INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - LARGE CELL - NIGHT (N3) (1755) 14

Back in the cell, Jamie next to Murtagh who drinks a tea.

MURTAGH
This is worse than yer last putrid
concoction.

JAMIE
It’s all I can manage, the governor
thinks I didna keep to his bargain.

MURTAGH
Dinna use me as a pawn. Ye do what
ye must...

(then)
What happened with Kerr? Same
fellow who was a MacKenzie
tacksman, when you fostered at
Leoch?

Jamie fills Murtagh in –-

JAMIE
Aye. But his mind was gone. His
speech was a mad rant, not much of
it made sense. He said the gold
was “cursed” and he mentioned
something about...

MURTAGH
Get on wi’ it, before I die of old
age.

JAMIE
A “white lady” who had some
connection with the gold.

MURTAGH
A white lady.

Murtagh knows Jamie better than anyone else in the world and
knows what Jamie’s thinking: Is Claire back?

MURTAGH (cont’d)
And ye’re thinking... after all
these years...?

JAMIE
Of course not.

MURTAGH
But... is it even possible?

JAMIE
I dinna ken.

MURTAGH
(a beat, then)

I wish we could know what became of
her once you sent her through the
stones.

JAMIE
(God knows he tried)

Wishing will no bring her back.

MURTAGH
But I think of her now and then.
And about the wee bairn she was
carrying.

JAMIE
Try not to think of it... It will
only bring ye pain and suffering.

MURTAGH
Can I at least pray them sound?

JAMIE
Aye, that ye can do.

Jamie can feel the heaviness in his heart. Corporal Brame
appears --

CORPORAL BRAME
Fraser! Get up.

14INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - GOVERNOR’S QUARTERS - NIGHT (N3) (1755) 15

Without warning, Jamie is ushered into the governor’s
quarters, expecting the worst. But when Jamie looks around,
he sees Grey waiting for him in a small DINING AREA on the
other side of the room from Grey’s desk. Jamie is
unshackled.

JOHN GREY
I am told you used to dine with
Governor Quarry. I trust you’ll do
me the same honor now.

Instead of a punishment, the DINNER TABLE set for two is
awaiting him. Grey intends to wine and dine Jamie to get
information out of him. On the way to the table, Jamie
glances over to a few BOOKS stacked on a small table, boldly
picks up the one on top: ROBINSON CRUSOE.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
You are interested in novels?

JAMIE
You think yer pleasantness will
loosen my tongue?

JOHN GREY
Of course I did not mean --

JAMIE
Ye can return me to the cells, if
ye have that in mind.

JOHN GREY
Mr. Fraser, I only ask you to dine
with me in an attempt to forge a
connection between us better suited
to our situation here.

MacKay brings in a PLATTER OF FOOD and sets it on the table.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
Lovely.

Grey picks up his fork, but Jamie doesn’t eat just yet. He
sees an opportunity.

JAMIE
Fine. Then I would ask your leave
to hunt for ourselves; since the
Crown cannot supply the men with
adequate food.

JOHN GREY
Hunt? Give you weapons and allow
you to wander the moors? God’s
teeth, Mr. Fraser!

JAMIE
Not weapons. And not wandering.
Will ye give us leave to set snares
upon the moor when we cut peats,
though? And to keep such meat as
we take? We could also gather
watercresses, sir...

JOHN GREY
What for?

JAMIE
To eat.

JOHN GREY
Why?

JAMIE
Eating green plants will stop ye
getting scurvy.

Grey is impressed by Jamie’s worldliness.

JOHN GREY
Wherever did you get that notion?

JAMIE
From my wife.

JOHN GREY
You’re married?

A beat.

JAMIE
She is gone.

There is a devastating sadness in Jamie’s voice which Grey
has never heard.

JOHN GREY
I see. Well... I shall take your
proposal under consideration, Mr.
Fraser. Now may we please begin?
The pheasant will get cold.

Jamie finally digs in, ravishing his plate.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
They’re an extremely feeble-minded
bird, all but beg to be shot;
nonetheless, quite tasty in a wine
sauce, wouldn’t you agree?

JAMIE
Aye, verra feeble-minded.

JOHN GREY
When you dined with Colonel Quarry,
were the men envious of that?

JAMIE
No. I’d tell them about it.

JOHN GREY
Of course you wouldn’t keep it from
them. I didn’t mean to suggest you
would.

JAMIE
Is this a vin de Bourgogne sauce?

JOHN GREY
I... um... I’m not sure. Colonel
Quarry left me a case of wine when
he left, but I will inquire as to
what the cook used.

OFF Grey, pondering the unusual man across the table --

16INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - LARGE CELL - NIGHT (N3) (1755)16

Jamie is surrounded by Murtagh, Lesley, Hayes and a few
others. Murtagh’s getting weaker every day.

JAMIE
We had roast pheasant -- in wine
sauce.

MURTAGH
Red wine?

JAMIE
Aye. Vin de Bourgogne. The bird
was served with carrots and
turnips, with sweet herbs... cruss
of rolls... topped wi’ butter --

LESLEY
Slow down, Mac Dubh. I want to
savor every morsal.

JAMIE
Then we had fresh salmon with a
ladleful of crawfish cullis.

For the men this is anything but torture, it’s a way to break
their bonds, if even for a brief moment.

JAMIE (cont’d)
And for dessert, warm spiced
Shrewsbury Cake with nutmeg and
cinnamon...

17INT. HIGH SCHOOL - AUDITORIUM - DAY (D4) (1966)17

A small GRADUATION CEREMONY. This time it’s Brianna’s --
she’s graduating high school. “Pomp and Circumstance” PLAYS.

ON BRIANNA, in traditional CAP and GOWN, as she marches up to
the stage --

ON FRANK AND CLAIRE in the audience, standing side by side,
but not touching. OTHER PARENTS hold hands or hug each other
as their child gets a diploma.

A HEADMASTER hands Brianna hers, and she shifts her tassel to
the left and looks out into the audience at her parents.
Frank and Claire APPLAUD, beaming.

FRANK
That’s my girl.

CLAIRE
(mouthing, to Brianna)

I’m so proud of you.

But as they continue to clap, it’s clear their connection is
to Brianna, and not to each other.

18EXT. SCOTTISH MOOR - DAY (D4) (1755)18

Out on the heather-covered moorland, the prisoners are
returning from PEAT-CUTTING DUTY. Similar to the crew that
went out in the first scene.

The light is fading and two prisoners break off with a guard
in tow -- it’s Lesley and Hayes. They check the SNARES and
TRAPS they were obviously allowed to set early in the day.
Seems Grey capitulated after all.

Jamie’s a part of the crew as well -- except he’s not
checking the traps -- he’s waiting.

The GUARDS seem more focused (or worried) on what Hayes and
Lesley are doing because they lose sight of Jamie for -- a
few seconds -- too long.

Quickly, as if it was pre-planned, Jamie peels back a section
of HEATHER, like a blanket, and dives underneath -- then the
two men following -- speedily cover him up. It’s as though
the moor swallowed him whole.

Matthew B. Roberts

We really wanted to show exactly how Jamie escapes from Ardsmuir. In the novel, his escape is not described in detail, but we wanted to show our viewers how Jamie does this and hiding underneath the heather was the method that we devised.

19INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - GOVERNOR’S QUARTERS - LATER19

A contrite looking Corporal Brame stands in front of an
astonished and angry John Grey, who rises from the seat
behind his desk --

JOHN GREY
... Escaped?! Hellfire, man.

Grey slams his fist down on his desk.

20EXT. SHORELINE - DAY (D5) (1755)20

Grey, Brame, and a few GUARDS search the shoreline, looking
for Red Jamie -- the now fugitive.

JOHN GREY
Are you sure the patrol caught a
sight of him here?

CORPORAL BRAME
Yes, sir. Thought they saw him
swimming out to the islands.

JOHN GREY
Spread out! I want the cliffs
searched in both directions -- and
keep an eye out for boats below;
God knows there’s room enough to
hide a sloop behind some of those
islands.

CORPORAL BRAME
If he went in anywhere along this
stretch, Major, you’ll have seen
the last of him. They call this
spot the Devil’s Cauldron, because
of the way it boils all the time.

(then)
Sir, it’s been three days now.

JOHN GREY
I do not need reminding, Corporal.
Remain here until nightfall then
return to the moor.

21EXT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - NEAR THE WALL - DAY (D6) (1755)21

NEXT MORNING AT DAWN. Grey stands near the high wall,
relieving himself. He’s in mid-stream when -- someone grabs
him around the neck
, completely by surprise. Jamie whispers
in Grey’s ear triumphantly --

JAMIE
That’s how it’s done, William Grey,
second son of Viscount Melton.

A callback to how Grey failed at sneaking up on Jamie once in
the woods. Jamie has finally acknowledged their first
meeting
.

JAMIE (cont’d)
How long did it take for your
comrades to find you after we tied
you to that tree?

JOHN GREY
(stunned)
What?

JAMIE
Were ye there so long as to shite
yourself?

Grey’s eyes flash as he realizes that Jamie has remembered
their meeting years ago just before Prestonpans.

JOHN GREY
You remembered.

JAMIE
Aye, when ye called me to your
quarters that first day. I tend to
remember anyone who’s tried to slit
my throat.

JOHN GREY
Why did you not speak before now?

JAMIE
I was waiting for the proper
occasion. Why did ye not remind
me?

JOHN GREY
I think you must know why.

Jamie tightens his grip. Grey chokes out an answer --

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
They were the actions of a foolish
boy. And I regret them to this
day, the mere memory burns shame
into my gut. But fortunately for
you, my foolishness at
Corrieyairack saved your life at
Culloden. Did it not?

JAMIE
Aye. Yer brother Lord Melton was
an honorable gentleman.

JOHN GREY
And my family debt to you has been
discharged.

Jamie reminds Grey --

JAMIE
But not yer promise.

JOHN GREY
Promise?

JAMIE
Aye, when last we parted. You
vowed to kill me if we were to ever
meet again. Well, here I am.

Jamie releases Grey, and then drops to his knees in
surrender. Jamie has clearly allowed himself to be captured
-- to Grey’s complete bewilderment. Grey composes himself
best he can. But as angry and humiliated as he is, he
gathers what dignity he has left.

JOHN GREY
I’m not a murderer of unarmed
prisoners. Nor shall I harm my
charges out of revenge.

(calling out)
Corporal Brame! Come at once!
Brame.

(then, to Jamie)
Why?

Matthew B. Roberts

The beginning of this scene when Jamie interrupts John Grey “mid-stream”, was something I wanted to do from the very beginning. I had an idea to incorporate a ‘call-back’ to Episode 209, when John Grey attacks Jamie while he is relieving himself. I wanted to convey that Jamie was most likely waiting for this moment, perhaps even engineering it to happen in a way. Consequently, we have a real sense of where Jamie is coming from, both literally and figuratively, as well as a sense of his disappointment and disillusionment. We begin to see that, without Claire, his life doesn’t matter to him anymore and that this is reflected in his behaviour as he surrenders to John Grey. John Grey, being the man that he is, however, won’t grant Jamie his wish, thereby forcing him to live.

23INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - GOVERNOR’S QUARTERS - DAY (D6) (1755)22

Jamie, back in chains now, is with Grey, who’s demanding to
know the reason for his escape. But the stubborn Highlander
refuses to say why he escaped or where he went.

JAMIE
It’s my private affair.

JOHN GREY
That is possibly the most outrageous
thing I have heard in my life!

JAMIE
Your life has been rather brief,
then, Major. If you will pardon my
saying so.

JOHN GREY
Have you any notion what I could do
to you for this?

JAMIE
Aye, I have, Major. But I’ve
prayed to the blessed Virgin and
I’m hoping she’s intervened on my
behalf.

JOHN GREY
You dare to mock me? Come here,
Mr. Fraser. Here! Stand here,
sir!

JAMIE
I am not a dog, Major. Ye’ll do as
ye like with me, but I’ll no’ come
when ye call me to heel.

JOHN GREY
My apologies, Mr. Fraser. I meant
no offense. I merely wish you to
approach nearer. If you will?

Jamie does, reluctantly.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
Did your escape have anything to do
with the matter of which you
learned from Duncan Kerr? I
suspect it has to do with the
French gold. Why else would you
risk such a foolish escape?

JAMIE
I cannot tell you, Major.

JOHN GREY
You have not honored my conditions,
Mr. Fraser.

Grey takes a deep breath. Infuriated by the stubborn
Highlander.

23INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - LARGE CELL - DAY (D6) (1755)23

Jamie’s wiping down Murtagh’s forehead with a cold rag,
nursing him the best he can. Murtagh is getting worse.

MURTAGH
If ye hadn’t wished to be captured,
ye wouldna been. What in God’s
name were ye thinkin’, ye gomeril?
Ye had yer freedom.

JAMIE
That’s not what I was searching
for.

MURTAGH
And did ye find such a thing?

JAMIE
No. And I must have been daft
indeed to believe I would.

He was looking for Claire, it doesn’t need to be said.

MURTAGH
In any case, why’d you come back to
this wretched place?

JAMIE
For you.

MURTAGH
If I had the strength to smack ye,
I would, Mac Dubh.

JAMIE
Of course ye would... But if I
hadna returned, ye’d have no one
left to scold.

Even in his weakened state, Murtagh manages a smirk. Jamie
stares at him. The truth is, he’d never leave his Godfather,
especially not while Murtagh is sick.

25EXT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - GOVERNOR’S QUARTERS - DAY (D7) (1755)24

Brame dumps a collection of pitiful RELICS and anonymous JUNK
onto Grey’s desk. MacKay is in the b.g. doing some chore.

CORPORAL BRAME
We found the usual rubbish, sir.
But this... is something you may
care to take notice of.

Grey picks up a small strip of TARTAN CLOTH.

JOHN GREY
Who does it belong to?

CORPORAL BRAME
Don’t know. Was hidden in the
crevice of the stone.

Grey turns to MacKay, who’s trying to edge out of the room
without being noticed. Grey stops him.

JOHN GREY
Which clan wears this tartan?

MACKAY
I... dinna ken, sir.

Grey knows he’s lying.

JOHN GREY
The possession of tartan is
strictly forbidden and is a
violation of the Act of
Proscription. If you choose to
withhold the information, I must
assume it’s yours. Need I remind
you of the punishment for such
offense?

MacKay, terrified, begins to speak.

MACKAY
‘Tis... Fraser tartan.

25EXT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - THE YARD - DAY (D7) (1755)25

It’s quiet. Until TWO GUARDS lead Murtagh out and tie him to
a post. He’s frail and unsteady on his feet.

A moment later Grey enters the yard, followed closely by
Corporal Brame, who carries a CAT AND NINE TAILS at his side.

The prisoners have been drawn up in ranks around the yard,
guards facing them, BAYONETS at the ready in case of trouble.
Everyone knows why they are here -- Murtagh is going to be
flogged. A guard helps Murtagh remove his shirt.

Grey watches from a short distance away. He nods towards two
guards, who escort Jamie over to stand with Grey while Brame
recites the sentence.

CORPORAL BRAME
In contravention of the Act of
Proscription, passed by His
Majesty’s Parliament, for which
crime the sentence of sixty lashes
shall be inflicted.

(then, to Grey)
Sir, shall I?

Jamie speaks urgently with Grey.

JAMIE
It’s my tartan.

JOHN GREY
I don’t believe you, Mr. Fraser.
But it’s noble of you to lie for
your friend.

JAMIE
He’s unwell, allow me to take his
punishment, then. It will serve
the same purpose. The men will
understand.

JOHN GREY
No.

JAMIE
He won’t survive it!

JOHN GREY
Then tell me the truth, Mr. Fraser.
Tell me why you escaped.

Jamie’s furious at Grey using Murtagh to extort him. Grey
knows Murtagh is Jamie’s Achilles’ heel. It’s a stand off.
Jamie eyes Grey hard, searching... for anything behind his
eyes... trying to look into his very soul. Then --

JAMIE
If ye are unwilling to bargain.
Get on with it then, have yer
British justice.

Murtagh smiles and nods proudly, bracing himself for what’s
to come.

CORPORAL BRAME
Governor? Shall I begin?

Grey hesitates. Jamie is calling his bluff.

JAMIE
Sixty lashes over a piece of worn
cloth.

JOHN GREY
Don’t test me, Mr. Fraser.

JAMIE
I’m no testing you, Major. We’re
all here because ye’re testing
yourself.

After a long tense beat.

JOHN GREY
Return the prisoner to his cell.
All the prisoners. Now.

Grey storms away, disgusted with himself. Jamie breathes a
sigh of relief as Murtagh is untied... Brame breathes a sigh
of relief as well, he wasn’t looking forward to doling out
sixty lashes.

26INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - LARGE CELL - DAY (D7) (1755)26

The main cell door is opened and a PHYSICIAN is led in by
Brame.

BRAME
Fitzgibbons is over there.

Brame points to Murtagh. Jamie rises, on guard.

JAMIE
What’s this then?

The physician moves over to Murtagh and begins to administer
the medicine as Jamie watches over the procedure.

BRAME
The governor ordered me to
accompany the doctor here -- to
treat your kinsman.

OFF Jamie’s surprise, especially after the event in the yard
earlier.

27EXT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - NEARBY MOOR - DAY (D7) (1755) 27

Grey walks with Jamie along the moor, just a short distance
outside the prison walls. The two guards watch closely
nearby, but far enough for Grey’s conversation to be private.

JOHN GREY
How did you know I wouldn’t go
through with the it?

JAMIE
I’ve looked into the eyes of men
who would have someone flogged for
stealing a piece of bread -- and no
lose a moment’s rest over it. Ye
dinna have those eyes, sir.

Jamie and Grey stop, turn to each other.

JOHN GREY
Perhaps I don’t. But as we stood
in that yard, Mr. Fraser, your eyes
revealed something as well.

Jamie can’t wait to hear this.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
You have suffered much pain in your
life, but the fact you would endure
a flogging for a friend means you
would never reveal yourself by
force. I might as well have been
beating the stone walls.

Jamie considers Grey, who is dead on in his assessment.

JAMIE
So ye thought you’d show me a
kindness instead?

JOHN GREY
Well, sir -- yes.

JAMIE
(under his breath)
The Devil ye ken.

JOHN GREY
Pardon.

JAMIE
I told ye faithfully all that Kerr
said to me that night. What I
didna tell ye was that some of what
he said had meaning to me.

JOHN GREY
What meaning was that?

JAMIE
I -- spoke to you of my wife.

JOHN GREY
Yes, you said that she was dead.

JAMIE
I said that she was gone. It is
likely she is dead, but -- my wife
was a healer. She was a white
lady. The word in Gaelic is ban-
druidh... it also means witch.

JOHN GREY
The white witch. So the man’s
words referred to your wife?

JAMIE
I thought they might. And if so --
I had to go. To see for myself.

JOHN GREY
How did you know where to go? Was
that also something you gleaned
from the vagrant’s words?

JAMIE
There is a spot I knew of, the
shrine to St. Bride. St. Bride was
also called “the white lady.” I
couldna say what Kerr meant, but I
felt I must go. It is thought to
be a shrine of great power, Major.

JOHN GREY
I see. And your wife...?

JAMIE
There was nothing there to do with
her. She is truly gone.

JOHN GREY
And the gold, Mr. Fraser?

JAMIE
Louis never sent gold to the
Stuarts. What I found was an empty
box, save for one jewel.

JOHN GREY
It is a moving story, Mr. Fraser.
Yet there is no evidence that it is
the truth.

JAMIE
Aye, there is, Major. I, too, am a
man of honor. And I give you my
word that my story is true. I have
this as well...

Jamie reaches into the waistband of his ragged breeches, then
holds out his hand and drops a small object into Grey’s
waiting palm. A BLUE SAPPHIRE. Grey chokes with surprise.

JAMIE (cont’d)
I saved it, thinking that it might
be some use, if I were ever to be
freed.

JOHN GREY
How did you keep this? You were
searched when you returned.

JAMIE
I swallowed it.

JOHN GREY
I see.

JAMIE
A diet of rough parritch has its
advantages, now and again.

JOHN GREY
It appears it does, Mr. Fraser.

As the two of them head back toward the prison --

28EXT. ARDSMUIR PRISON28

Establishing. Snow covers the moor, melts and we move back
into spring.

INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - GOVERNOR’S QUARTERS - NIGHT (N8) 29 29
(1756)

28INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - GOVERNOR’S QUARTERS - NIGHT (N8) (1756)29

As Grey and Jamie play chess at a CHESS TABLE in the living
area of the Governor’s quarters.

JOHN GREY
Good to see your friend,
Fitzgibbons is better.

Jamie’s focused on the chess board. Grey moves.

JAMIE
Aye, much.

(re: the move)
Why ye cunning wee bastard! Where
the hell did ye learn that trick?

JOHN GREY
My elder brother taught it to me.

JAMIE
It is Lord Melton ye mean?

JOHN GREY
Yes.

JAMIE
Your brother very stubbornly
refused to shoot me. I wasna
inclined to be grateful for the
favor at the time.

JOHN GREY
You wished to be shot?

JAMIE
I thought I had reason.

JOHN GREY
What reason? I mean no
impertinence in asking. It is only
-- at that time, I -- I felt
similarly. From what you have said
of the Stuarts, I cannot think that
the loss of their cause would have
led you to such despair.

JAMIE
There were those who fought for
love of Charles Stuart -- or from
loyalty to his father’s right of
kingship. But you are right, I
wasna one of those.

JOHN GREY
I said that I felt much as you did,
at the time. I -- lost a
particular friend at Culloden. He
was the reason I joined the army.
He... inspired me. My brother was
there when I found him dying on the
field. I couldn’t even say a
proper goodbye... I would have
stayed there with him forever, but
Hal dragged me away, he was
embarrassed, you see.

INTERCUT WITH:

30EXT. CULLODEN MOOR - BRITISH FIELD HOSPITAL - FLASHBACK 30

[NOTE: We will INTERCUT John Grey’s FLASHBACK of Culloden as
he’s telling the following story. This was previously shot
as an appendix in Episode 301.]

31INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - GOVERNOR’S QUARTERS - RESUME31

Back with Jamie and John Grey as he finishes his story.

JOHN GREY
He said I would overcome it -- come
to terms with it -- in time. Hal
is generally right, but not always.
Some people, you grieve over
forever. Do you find your life
greatly burdensome, Mr. Fraser?

JAMIE
Perhaps not greatly so. I think
perhaps the greatest burden lies in
caring for those we cannot help.
Not in having no one for whom to
care. That is emptiness. But no
great burden.

JOHN GREY
Your wife -- she was a healer, you
said?

JAMIE
She was. She... her name was
Claire.

It’s the first he’s spoken her name in a very long time.

JOHN GREY
You cared very much for her, I
think?

JAMIE
I had meant to thank you sometime,
Major.

JOHN GREY
Thank me? For what?

JAMIE
For that night at Corrieyairack
where we first met. For what ye
did for my wife.

JOHN GREY
That was your wife?

JAMIE
Ye were a worthy foe, Major. D’ye
blame me?

JOHN GREY
If you found a sixteen-year-old
shitting himself with fear a worthy
foe, Mr. Fraser, then it is little
wonder that the Highland army was
defeated!

JAMIE
A man that doesna shit himself with
a knife held to his throat, has
either no bowels, or no brains. Ye
wouldna speak to save your own
life, but ye would do it to save a
lady’s honor. The honor of my own
lady. I admire that.

JOHN GREY
I did nothing for your wife. She
was in no danger, after all!

JAMIE
But ye didna ken that at the time,
aye? Ye thought to save her life
and virtue, at the risk of your
own. I have thought of it now and
again, since I -- since I lost her.

JOHN GREY
I see. I am sorry for your loss.

Having a good bit of sherry in him, and feeling close to
Jamie because of their mutual confessions of lost loves, and
Jamie’s sincere compliment, Grey touches Jamie’s hand...
Jamie calmly commands Grey --

JAMIE
Take your hand off me -- or I will
kill you.

Grey slowly removes his hand as if from an unexploded mine.
Jamie rises without another sound and leaves the room.
Leaving Grey ashamed and hurt all over again.

33INT. CLAIRE & FRANK’S HOME - LIVING ROOM - NIGHT (N5) (1966)32

Claire’s sitting in the dim light when she hears Frank enter
the room.

FRANK
Tough surgery? I can tell by
looking at you.

CLAIRE
They all seem tough these days.

FRANK
You’ve done whatever you could --
worrying about it now won’t
change... Ah, well, I’ve said it
all before.

CLAIRE
You have.

But he’s not here for idle chit-chat, there’s something on
his mind.

CLAIRE (cont’d)
What is it?

FRANK
I’d like to take Brianna to
England.

CLAIRE
That would be lovely. How long
will you go for?

FRANK
I’ve had an offer for a position at
Cambridge. A good one.

She processes the implications.

CLAIRE
What about the hospital...? My
patients? I can’t just leave
Boston and move to England...

FRANK
I’m not asking you to leave.

(then)
I’m divorcing you.

Claire reels at the news.

CLAIRE
Divorce? We had this discussion
years ago.

FRANK
I know what I said then. But
Brianna’s eighteen now. And she’s
coming with me.

It starts hitting Claire now. This is an ambush.

CLAIRE
Does she know about this plan?

FRANK
Not yet. But she’ll come
willingly. Between med school and
the hospital, you haven’t spent
nearly as much time with her as I
have.

CLAIRE
How dare you?

FRANK
Besides, there are fine
universities there. Oxford for
one, I still have some pull.

CLAIRE
(spits)
What about Candy?

FRANK
Her name is Sandy. I’m going to
marry her, as soon as I’m free.

CLAIRE
(gobsmacked, laughs)

Marry her? You can’t be serious.

But the look on his face tells her that he is.

FRANK
I’m finished with this, Claire.

CLAIRE
You... bloody... bastard.

FRANK
Do be reasonable.

CLAIRE
You’ve been waiting, all this time.
Waiting for the clock to run out.
Well, Bree’s my daughter, and
you’re not taking her anywhere!

FRANK
I don’t think I’ll have to.

CLAIRE
You want to divorce me. Fine. Use
any grounds you like -- with the
exception of adultery, which you
can’t prove, because it doesn’t
exist. But if you try to take Bree
away with you, I’ll have a thing or
two to say about adultery.

FRANK
This isn’t about us anymore.
Bree’s a grown woman now. She can
make her own decisions. She’s got
her own life. And I want to spend
the rest of mine with a wife who
truly loves me.

The statement hangs there, Claire doesn’t counter it. Then --

FRANK (cont’d)
You couldn’t see Brianna without
thinking of him, could you?
Without that constant memory, I
wonder -- would you have forgotten
him, in time?

CLAIRE
That amount of time doesn’t exist.

Frank leaves. Claire HEARS a CAR DOOR SLAM, then an ENGINE
ROAR TO LIFE and then FADE AWAY.
The phone RINGS --

Matthew B. Roberts

Unbeknownst to them both, this is the final act of Claire and Frank’s marriage–the moment when the illusion is finally shattered and their mutual disillusionment is crystal clear. I wanted to be true to the characters in the television show and capture the intensity of their emotion. For Brianna’s sake Claire and Frank are both excellent actors but friends and colleagues at the university and the hospital can see right through their performance. I decided to adjust a moment from the novel when Frank tells Claire that he thinks that she couldn’t see Brianna without thinking of Jamie. In the book, when Frank ask Claire, “would you have forgotten him, in time?”, Claire simply says noleaving Frank, in my mind, with the sliver of hope, albeit the smallest sliver of hope, that someday, perhaps with a little more time, they might still have had a chance to make things right. I thought that Claire needed a moment in which she could remove Frank’s hope entirely, and let him know that even if they could just have stayed together longer they would not have been happy. In this version, then, Claire is very clear, and tells Frank that the amount of time she would need to forget Jamie does not existand as painful as this may be for Frank, in saying this she sets him free and spares him a lifetime of regret.

CLAIRE (cont’d)
(answering)

Dr. Randall... Yes... Are they
prepping for surgery...? All
right, I’m on my way.

-- a call from the hospital. Claire hangs up, it’s robotic;
perhaps because she’s done this a thousand times before or
because the prison she lives in just got lonelier.

33EXT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - THE YARD - DAY (D9) (1756)33

A WEEK LATER. The prisoners are ASSEMBLED. An order is
given for them to be marched off toward the gate. Everyone
except Jamie who is suddenly yanked from the line by Corporal
Brame, pulled away from Murtagh -- healthier now -- without a
chance to even utter a goodbye.

JAMIE
What’s happening?

Matthew B. Roberts

Here we see Murtagh and Jamie being separated from one anotherwe don’t know where either one is going but we wanted to show that you don’t always get to say goodbye to your loved ones and that you should take every opportunity to say what you mean. This is echoed in Claire’s story too.

CORPORAL BRAME
Prison’s closing... The prisoners
are being removed. The fortress is
to be garrisoned by the Seventh
Queen’s Own Regiment of Dragoons.

JAMIE
Removed? To where?

But Brame doesn’t answer. He delivers Jamie to Major Grey,
who’s mounted and ready to ride out. Jamie is SHACKLED by
his WRISTS (only) and leashed to Grey’s horse, and they head
away from Ardsmuir.

JAMIE (cont’d)
Where are we being taken?

Grey doesn’t answer. Instead, he reins his horse around and
heads out of the prison; Jamie being pulled behind him.

Jamie glances back to the other prisoners, who are being
marched in the opposite direction. Murtagh looks back as
well, and as one final look passes between them --

34INT. BOSTON HOSPITAL - HALLWAY - NIGHT (N5) (1966)34

Claire’s with a CONCERNED HUSBAND --

CLAIRE
Frances is in recovery. Stable and
all her vitals are good. The best
thing you can do for her now is get
some rest...

The husband hugs Claire and leaves. Suddenly, Claire looks
up and sees Joe hurrying toward her. Claire takes one look
at his FACE -- she’s seen doctors deliver the news of death
too often to mistake the signs. PUSH IN ON CLAIRE as we hear
Joe tell her the awful news...

JOE
Claire... I’m sorry... It’s
Frank... It was a car accident.

Claire races to --

35INT. BOSTON HOSPITAL - ROOM - MOMENTS LATER 35

FRANK’S BODY lies on a metal table, his face pale and blue.
Claire closes her eyes and touches him.

CLAIRE
Frank, if you’re still close enough
to hear me -- I did love you. Very
much. You were... my first love.

Claire exits and walks down the blank hallway, weeping for
Frank, heading for the outer doors -- and even though she
didn’t want it this way -- heading for freedom.

Matthew B. Roberts

Claire is deprived of the chance to be able to say goodbye properly to Frank before he diesbut she does it here in her own way. I think that the last scenes of the episode complement one another: Claire is tragically ‘freed’ from her marriage and Jamie is now free from Ardsmuir, though both remain essentially imprisoned in heart and soul by the very fact that they are not together.

36EXT. LAKE DISTRICT OF ENGLAND - ROAD - DAY (D10) (1756)36

Jamie walks behind Grey, who’s on horseback. They’ve been
traveling for days. The anger and sorrow of his parting from
his men, including his Godfather, fresh in his memory, and
the anticipation of an unknown destination fills Jamie with
dread.

Jamie stops, eyes Grey hard.

JAMIE
It’s no better than slavery.

JOHN GREY
A term of indenture is not slavery.
The other prisoners will regain
their freedom after a term of
fourteen years.

JAMIE
If they survive. Why was I not
sent to the territories, or the
Colonies with them?
Why did you
keep me here?

JOHN GREY
You are not merely a prisoner, but
a convicted traitor, imprisoned at
the pleasure of His Majesty. Your
sentence cannot be commuted without
Royal approval.

And His Majesty has not seen fit to
give that approval. I couldn’t
give you freedom, Fraser. This is
the next best I could manage.

Jamie looks at Grey, not sure whether to believe him.

JAMIE
Where am I to go, then?

JOHN GREY
It’s called Helwater. You will
serve Lord Dunsany. I shall visit
you once each quarter -- to ensure
your welfare.

JAMIE
(dubious)
My welfare?

JOHN GREY
But I caution you... your new host
is not well disposed toward Charles
Stuart or his followers. You can
scarcely hope to conceal the fact
that you are a Scot, a Highlander
at that. If you will consider a
piece of well-meant advice, it
might be judicious not to use a
name which would be as easily
recognized as your own.

And as they crest the ridge, Grey gestures to where the
HELWATER LANDS spread out before them. The magnificent view
belies its name and it’s not what Jamie was expecting.

JAMIE
Why did you do this for me? I
didna let ye have yer way?

Grey gets off his horse, UNLOCKS Jamie’s WRIST SHACKLES,
takes a beat...

JOHN GREY
I regret that particular moment of
weakness. It was foolish of me.
But I told you about... someone I
cared for. And you shared the
same. You gave me my life all
those years ago. Now, I give you
yours. I hope ye’ll use it well.

JAMIE
Yer brother discharged that debt.

JOHN GREY
For the sake of the family name. I
discharge it for the sake of my
own.

The two men share a look... it’s not quite brotherly love but
there’s definitely a mutual admiration.

JOHN GREY (cont’d)
(back to business)

Now, Mr. Fraser, let’s be on our
way.

37EXT. HELWATER - A SHORT TIME LATER37

Grey brings Jamie to the front entrance of the magnificent
house where he speaks briefly with a FOOTMAN. Then they’re
lead to --

38EXT. HELWATER - STABLES - MOMENTS LATER 38

As they approach the area where the horses are kept.

JOHN GREY
You’ll serve as a groomsman.

Jamie inhales the aromas of fresh cut hay, leather, and
horses that he loves and is instantly comforted by its
familiarity. He turns to Grey.

JAMIE
Thank you.

JOHN GREY
You can repay my kindness by not
breaking your parole.

(adds)
And by putting down your burdens,
and living the best life you can.

Grey turns his horse and rides away. Jamie’s finally alone.
He walks over to a large STALLION -- and throws his arms
around the horse’s thick neck. It’s not heaven. But it’s
the farthest from hell he’s felt in a long, long time.

FADE OUT.

END OF EPISODE

APPENDIX

12INT. ARDSMUIR PRISON - GUARDS’ ROOM - DAY (D3) (1755) 12

Jamie’s with Duncan Kerr who’s being kept inside one of the
spare rooms in the guards’ quarters. The furnishings are
sparse, just a SMALL BED and TABLE. Jamie kneels on one side
of Kerr who lies in the bed, moaning and very sick.

Grey watches from the door, listening to WHISPERS of Gaelic
and French, Kerr jumbling his words, struggling to
communicate. Jamie comforts Kerr, holding his hand, and
wiping his fevered brow.

ON GREY -- oddly touched by Jamie’s gentleness with the sick
man as he lies dying. From Grey’s POV we just get a snippet
of the conversation.

JAMIE
(to Kerr,)

Be still, a charaid, bi
samhach. Mo charaid.

(whispers a warning)
All you say will be told to
the English.

(Gaelic)
What do you know of the
Frenchman’s gold?

JAMIE G
(to Kerr,)

Be still, a charaid, bi
samhach. Mo charaid.

(whispers a warning)
All you say will be told to
the English.

(Gaelic)
Dé ur n-eòlas air òr an
Fhrangaich?

Duncan answers with a mix of French, English, and Gaelic.

DUNCAN
The gold is cursed. Do ye be
warned, lad. It was given by
the ban-druidh, the white
witch.

DUNCAN G
Tha ‘n t-òr est maudit.
Prenez garde, mon garçon. It
was donné by the bhan-
draoidh.

Jamie’s heart leaps. A white witch?

JAMIE
Who is she? The white witch?

DUNCAN

She seeks a brave man. A
MacKenzie. It is theirs, she
says it, for the sake of him
who is dead. She is a soul-
eater. She is death. He is
dead, the MacKenzie is dead.

DUNCAN G
She seeks a brave man. Fear
do chlann ‘Ic Coinnich. It
is theirs, she says it, pour
lui qui est mort. She is a
soul-eater. Elle est la
morte. Tha esan air
bàsachadh, tha MacCoinnich
air bàsachadh.

Jamie looks over his shoulder, conscious of Grey watching
him. He says loudly, for Grey’s benefit --

JAMIE (cont’d)
The gold, man. Where is the gold?

He squeezes Duncan’s hand, and Kerr rolls his head side to
side, muttering crazily.

DUNCAN
All of them. All dead!
Colum, Dougal, Ellen, too.
Folk do say, how Ellen
MacKenzie did leave her
brothers and her home, and go
to wed with a silkie from the
sea. She heard them, aye?

(looking dreamily)
She heard the silkies
singing, there upon the
rocks, one, two and three of
them, and she saw from her
tower, so she came down, and
went to the sea to live with
the silkies. Aye? Did she
no’?

DUNCAN G
A h-uile fear ac’. Tous
morts! Colum, Dougal,
Eileag, too. “Folk do say,
how Ellen MacKenzie na
braithrean aice agus home,
and go to wed with a silkie
from the sea.” She heard
them, aye?

(looking dreamily)
She heard the silkies
singing, air na creagan, one,
two and three of them, and
she saw from her tower, puis
elle s’est descendue, and
went to the sea to live with
the silkies. Aye? N’est
elle pas?

Grey comes over --

JOHN GREY
What did he say? What?

JAMIE
(to Kerr)

Speak to me, man, tell me again!

JOHN GREY
Wake up! Speak to us!

Grey shakes Kerr’s shoulders, but Duncan’s eyes roll back in
his head as he gives one last raspy whisper --

DUNCAN
She will come for you.

DUNCAN G
Thig i gur n-iarraidh.

He closes his eyes, squeezes Jamie’s hand one last time.
Then goes quiet. His hand slips out of Jamie’s. Jamie makes
the sign of the cross. Kerr is dead.